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  1. koputai

    koputai

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  2. Marc

    Marc

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  3. gibbo9000

    gibbo9000

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  4. Full Range

    Full Range

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/07/20 in all areas

  1. I thought I would share some experience on battery performance in what is probably a typical installation in suburban Melbourne. We have a 5.4kW PV system installed in 2012 with Tesla Powerwall (13.2kW storage) from 2018. My view is PV systems well and truly pay for themselves, but batteries not so - so maybe they have to go in the hobby or feel good camp. We are on a two tier tariff and our numbers show pretty consistent $150 a quarter saving across the year on top of the PV system - so roughly a 20 year payback ($600 a year on $12k for battery), which is likely well beyond the expect
    3 points
  2. Naturally when I was thinking about having a PV system installed at home I also thought “I should probably get a battery as well”. A couple of d friends have Tesla batteries and rave about them, so I was keen to convince myself that I needed one too. Now, I always spend heaps of time analysing my projects, thinking of the various ways it could be done, done better, done prettier, and occasionally in that process I reconsider whether it should actually be done at all. Price definitely comes in to play, but I don’t like to do things cheap, that’s usually just the long way to spending m
    2 points
  3. Yeah... nah This reads like the usual crap the Smart Energy Council puts out. There's actually nothing unfair about it. When you consume energy you pay for retail margin + wholesale margin + transmission factor + market fees + environmental levy + distribution charges. That last bit is important - the money that goes into maintaining the poles and wires is paid when you use energy. When you export energy and a small (e.g. including residential) system you currently do not pay many money to maintain the poles and wires, and you get paid a fee which usually exceeds the whol
    2 points
  4. Our electricity bill for the 3rd quarter is in. Over winter, 28 May to 27th August, our breakdown was as follows. Solar Production was 2,725 kWh at an average of 29.6 kWh per day. Our usage of the solar production was 1,400 kWh, which is 51% own usage. Our usage from the grid was 2,216 kWh at a cost of $732.52, and we fed 1,325 kWh back to the grid (after own usage) for a return of $279.26. Our net bill was $453.26 Taking in to account our own usage, the total saving for the quarter due to the solar was $564.57 Effectively, our bill was reduced fro
    2 points
  5. @Fred it really depends on needs and what you want to spend. You need to give yourself an uptime requirement, e.g. 'I want to meet my power requirements xx % of the time'. For what it's worth a 99% system means that nearly 4 days are offline. If you were doing it properly IMHO you'd have: Solar PV to whatever your demand is Good thermal storage because its cheaper Battery to suit (Optionally) smart UPS for critical loads (internet, security, etc - enough for the house to tell itself what's happening under all conditions) Diesel SGP for backup
    2 points
  6. I've just joined, having seen Marc's link from Stereo Net Australia. We've got a domestic system, with battery, running LG panels (about 7.8kW ) from memory. It's been the best thing we've done. In terms of other renewable or free energy activity, we run a couple of worm-farms using domestic food scraps. I've also been a glider pilot since the age of 17, using natural atmospheric sources of lift to fly and travel cross-country, sometimes for hours and hundreds of kilometres.
    2 points
  7. Hi Full Range, You will be wanting a PHEV (Plug in hybrid electric vehicle) if you want a hybrid that, as the name suggests, plugs in. There aren't a whole lot to choose from at the moment, but more are on the way. This gives you a much cheaper buy in point at this time to get a taste of electric mobility. Off the top of my head, Mitsubishi, Volvo and Hyundai all have PHEV offerings. Think there are some older BMW's, Mercs and Audis that offer the tech too. You will save a heap over an all battery EV, but that will come at the cost of all electric range.
    2 points
  8. I installed an Enphase/Jinko system in late 2018. I have been very happy with it ever since. I wanted to future proof it as much as possible and be ready for 2 x electric cars so I went the biggest I could fit on the roof - 35.65kW of panels and 30kW of inverters. Actually had to extend the car garage to fit all 115 panels on! Anyway, it was a fun project and is on track to pay for itself in the next couple of years (assuming FiT does not crash horribly). In summer it prints me quite large monthly cheques, and in winter it mints smaller cheques but still ensures zero bills. Best day to d
    2 points
  9. As far as I am aware the only state that has a home battery power storage subsidy scheme Is South Australia Is it time for the commonwealth and other states to generate some interest in home battery storage subsidies I feel that by doing this, it will by sheer numbers reduce initial cost over time If that is coupled with an innovation grant scheme for research of future battery storage technology to help in reducing our greenhouse footprint from manufacture to end user My preferred battery system will have these core features 1) High capacity 2) Long Life
    2 points
  10. Anecdotally around $17k installed with inverter etc. Will be interested to hear actual price if someone has one at their place. Issues are poor round trip efficiency, need an additional inverter in conjunction with the battery, they need down time to do some sort of maintenance cycle (not a problem if you have two connected as they self manage so both aren't off line). On the plus side, they should last twice as long as a lithium battery, can withstand hot environments (i.e. Australia), they don't use rare earth metals and can do 100% DoD without damage. If I could afford one and had a 20 year
    2 points
  11. 22 Panels totaling 5.4kW and Delta Solivia inverter dating back to 2012 and still going strong. Added Powerwall 2 in 2018 along with upgrading breakers on PV set up, and rewiring and separating internal switchboard into a main and sub board to separate out the essential circuits (backed up by Powerwall) from the rest. Best advice the sparky's ever gave us was to install an MDF panel on some 2 x 4 timber behind the Powerwall / Inverter etc. to hide all the wiring. The Powerall is an AC connected system that sits on the house side of the Solar PV inverter, and comprises the battery an
    2 points
  12. With a name like Full Range, I expect nothing less! 🙂 Thanks again for the reply. No Gas here and electric HWS. Average 22 kW per day. I have so many aspects to my Stereo and would love to know what it all uses. Lots on small power supplies running different items. I could try and put it all on one plug and use one of those little meters. In the past year have replaced a few things. Got a new fridge 520L kitchen, New F&P Front loader washing machine, New 65" TV's and threw out my 2nd 20yr old fridge I had in back garage all in the hope of lowering my Energy bills.
    1 point
  13. These are the 330W panels that were recommended for me so you can compare the specs https://www.trunsunsolar.com/wp-content/uploads/download/au/EN-DUDRIVE-TSHM-120L-AU.pdf And this is the inverter Sungrow is the worlds number one inverter manufacturer https://service.sungrowpower.com.au/files/Web_Files/FAQ/Crystal/Troubleshooting/UM_201803_Crystal G2_SG3K_5K-D Datasheet_V1.0.pdf
    1 point
  14. The supplier mentioned I should be fine with 8kW inverter with Synergy but said that may be the limit for them. But no feed in paid after 5kW. Currently it is at 3c Looked at Solar Hot water but think being a house of 1 and will make it having showers in the day hours that Instantaneous might be ok. The solar panels are already such a big investment for me.
    1 point
  15. I have the 5kw Sungrow inverter and have no problems at all so far I have also learned recently that if you add a seperate ( I think it’s called ) a Sungrow S100 Energy meter. With this extra meter you can also see via the app the export to the grid amount and many other features over the standard dongle Without the meter you only see your input from the panels to the inverter
    1 point
  16. A couple of news stories that indicate that solid state batteries are close to being a reality in EVs The expectations are shorter recharge times and longer distance travel time Samsung https://www.whichcar.com.au/car-news/samsung-solid-state-battery-breakthrough Toyota https://thedriven.io/2020/12/14/toyota-plans-revolutionary-solid-state-battery-for-2021/ Other news https://www.wired.co.uk/article/what-is-solid-state-battery-toyota-dyson https://insideevs.com/news/465188/nio-150-kwh-solid-state-batteries-2022/
    1 point
  17. It would be a newer, more modern meter that would be installed. When I had our system installed, before it was allowed to be turned on I had to have a new meter put in. The old one was a digital Time-of-use one. Origin put the new one in, at a cost of $45. The new one is read remotely online, no need for a meter reader to come around. On the Origin website, with the new smart meters you can see your daily usage, and your daily feed-in. They’re well worth having, especially at the very low cost that Origin charges for the installation.
    1 point
  18. Well the first 3 months went quick Regular monitoring gave me a good indication of how much power I’m generating Just a refresh I have a 6.6 kWh system x 5 Kw inverter x 20 Panels Highest daily generation was 39.8 kWh ( and it’s not summer yet ) with an average of approx 28 kWh I just received my first bill and I’m happy to report that it’s in credit Drum roll Credit $424.39 At this rate I will pay off the system in no time System cost was $3500
    1 point
  19. I'm still waiting for the end of my first billing period, but it's looking pretty good going by the Fronius data. 8.2kW inv, (limited to 5kW export). Since 18/11: PV production = 2,440 kWh (~39 kWh/d average , ~65 kWh/d peak) Self consumption = 526 kWh Total consumption = 981 kWh.
    1 point
  20. Analysis for the full year of 2020 Total Production: 12.882 MWh Total Consumption: 12.931 MWh Highest Production Day: 59.3 kWh on 11th November Lowest Production Day: 1.9 kWh on 26th July Daily Averages - Production: 35.2 kWh Consumption: 35.3 kWh Own Consumption: 16.6 kWh Export: 18.6 kWh Import: 18.7 kWh Cost: $1.88 Yield: 4.1 kWh/kW
    1 point
  21. Like a lot of people, I've looked at getting solar installed a few times over the past fifteen years. Up until recently, the payback wasn't there in a timeframe I was happy with. Last November, I thought it was about time to get it done, before the providers started refusing installs as they are in some areas. I looked at both string and micro-inverter systems, and as my roof is north facing (points 9 degrees east of north, inclined at 23 degrees), and totally unshaded, a string system was a good option. In late November 2019 I had a 8.58kW system installed using: 26x QCe
    1 point
  22. By the way pricing as supplied to me was: 5.0kWh 48V WITH 5kw Sungrow Hybrid Inverter (single phase) for $6500 8.5kWh 48V with 5kW Sungrow Hybrid inverter (Single phase) for $10500 15kWh 384V with 10kW Solax Hybrid inverter (3 phase) for $18500 Price for 15kWh without inverter was approx $14500 All claim 50,000 cycles with 25 year warranty and 99% depth discharge and operating temperature range of -20 to +80c 5kWh weighs 65kg, 8.5kWh is 97kg and 15kWh is 120kg
    1 point
  23. I stumbled across them as well and have been trying to get more information out of the company. They are claiming that the "battery" is currently undergoing the approval process and they expect it to be available for purchase around March next year. I am actually in the market for a home battery and the specs and price on these are very attractive but I am somewhat doubtful as I can't find any evidence that anyone else it the world is doing this and the specs don't seem to add up with what I understand of Graphene supercapacitors. In particular the weight of the product is similar to we
    1 point
  24. A fairly simple way of gauging relative performance, day to day, or site to site etc, is kWh/kW. Simply divide the kWh produced by the kW of panels installed. So in your case of your average production, 28 / 6.6 = 4.24 kWh/kW over the period. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  25. An excellent result. Not sure about Brissy, but August and September were very good months for solar in Sydney. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  26. Let me know how you go. I deal with the CEO and main advisor though I've been involved with them for ~5 years now (since it was in development). If you don't get answers you like, drop me a line and I'll find you someone senior to talk to. I like both Reposit and CET. Reposit is further ahead in making money out of your battery - they are super represented in all government forums on VPP whether technical or regulatory. But if you have multiple devices you want to control intelligently against each other for best use of your tariff, CET is supreme. And the hot water system is effin
    1 point
  27. You can mount the gateway in it's own sub adjacent to your main and pickup your solar via Modbus TCP. This is an example of Reposit's pre-packaged board (seen here three phase). CET not much different. Breaker, PSU, Reposit's meters are DIN mounted. CET's are not so you just have the breaker and PSU (I think on the PSU, can check). For what it's worth my main board (where the gateway is) became my sub board when I upgraded to three phase (was easier in my situation) - they're metres apart and it all works just fine. If I was doing it again I'd do what we did at a friend's place
    1 point
  28. No supply fee, though a dude came around and locked the meter out. I guess it's not bad; leaves the option in future.
    1 point
  29. If you want to have a chat with the lead devs let me know, can arrange.
    1 point
  30. I've had a long-term interest in sustainable living and renewable energy. My wife and I moved here from Melbourne around 4 years ago, having dismantled and recycled the original home on the site and replaced it with a prefab home. It's not quite as energy efficient as we'd like (ie, it isn't a passive house), but hopefully we can add some thermally broken triple glazed windows in a few years. We have a grid connected hybrid PV system and battery, we hope to upgrade our panels from 4.5kW to 10kW by the end of the year. We have a 17kW lead-acid gel battery, but only 4kW is routinely useable unle
    1 point
  31. It’s a thing. I know, I’ve got it. I check our power consumption between two and ten or so times a day. Last Friday I had a Fronius Smart Meter installed to monitor consumption on my circuits that I call ‘Climate’, which is air conditioning and underfloor heating. I now know how much power the underfloor heating in the bathrooms really uses. 15kWh per day on weekends, and 10kWh per day during the week. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  32. BTW - glad i'm not alone then!
    1 point
  33. I haven't looked at Reposit lately but looked interesting a couple of years back, but they were a bit 'young' as a company and it was hard to get clear information on its capabilities. Hopefully that has improved. What I would look for in any truly 'smart' controller is something that looks at the local radiation forecast for the next day and and makes optimisation decisions based on that, particularly in a 2 tier tariff situations. Only that way can they effectively manage overnight charge levels depending on expected solar generation the next day. Some do that on a ' what we expect this
    1 point
  34. WOW - That is impressive 😱 Im going to give you a “Respect “ for that system
    1 point
  35. Hi Marc, Being a micro inverter system, I need one inverter per panel, so I have 115 inverters in total. Every inverter is rated at 260 Watts continuous, so 115 x 260 = 29,900 W of inverters. In reality the inverters can spike to 270 Watts for a combined temporary output of 31,050 W. There is a pretty specific set of conditions required to exceed 30kw however and I have only ever seen it a couple of times for brief periods. Output of the system to grid is limited to 30kW, so thats the max that will ever pump back to the grid, but I can exceed that briefly if consuming the delta in the ho
    1 point
  36. I'm a Redflow shareholder, and it was too expensive for me, even with a (small) shareholder's discount. They are about to introduce their generation 2 batteries, if this flows though to the Z Cell, it may be cheaper
    1 point
  37. Our journey into solar started a few years ago. It's good to be here. I'll post more about the system soon. Cheers.
    1 point
  38. Maintaining stability in the grid should be looked at as a free pass for the power generators With the right smart inverter connected to a solar / storage battery system this is achievable when critical mass is reached
    1 point
  39. Totally agree. I would go further and suggest the subsidy could be moved from panels / inverters towards batteries, and the power distribution companies should chip in as well. Whilst panel / inverter subsidies have been great, we are at the point where underlying costs make them a sensible investment decision without subsidies. And if the distribution companies continue to struggle (and not invest) in a network that that will embrace distributed generation, subsidise batteries to help maintain balance onthe use of the grid.
    1 point
  40. I've heard that we should be seeing a "new generation" of batteries arriving on the market for what would have been the end of this year, but at a guess that might be delayed because of COVID? I was also told that arrival would bring prices down and the possibility of more government grants/schemes. All rumours though. 🙂
    1 point
  41. Welcome @Full Range and glad you could join us (at another little corner of the web). One of the conveniences of working nights when it comes to power consumption. Without batteries, it will be interesting come Summer if you will truly get a zero bill? I've done my best to get our overnight power usage down but with servers and so many "standby" products, it seems an impossible reality unfortunately.
    1 point
  42. With FIT dropping all the time, and with a 10kW+ solar PV I find myself with surplus power each day for a grand return of less than $2 a day credit. It's hardly worth it when I have an EV sitting there that could make more economical use of that surplus power. I wanted a set and forget way of charging the EV rather than monitoring the export manually and plugging in when required. Elon says, a happy Tesla is a plugged in Tesla (to max 80% for best battery life apparently). So my hunt for a solution led me to Myenergi (UK) and its Zappi charger. It's been installed today and was a di
    1 point
  43. thanks for the input guys. I've asked installer for their recommendations where to spend extra money. Fronius inverter and Jinko panels seems like a common combination they do for better systems.
    1 point
  44. Cool, so you can get total combined data in your energy balance. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  45. Welcome @Jone5y and thanks for joining us. Look forward to sharing your solar and EV journey with you. Before installing solar 6 months ago, and then EV ownership last month I knew nothing at all (not that I know much now!) and it would have been great to have a resource like this one. Hopefully you'll get the advice and guidance you need to make informed decisions.
    1 point
  46. I don't know for sure but I think this might be practically impossible. The industry has become so regulated now, and even though some of the installers out there might be better suited to washing windows, I think the red tape and inspections process would see no solar company allowing you to supply or install any part of the system that ultimately they get signed off to their name. The inspections process (in VIC) has apparently caused many installers to leave the industry. Whether it was because their work was not up to standard in the first place, or whether the inspectors are being ov
    1 point
  47. There are a few gems out there, but unfortunately not the mainstream guys. Hopefully this forum will surface some of our joint experiences and help mobilise what I am sure is a wealth of personal knowledge on more linformed ideas and solutions. I went through many iterations of clamps and monitoring with solar alone (as Solivia Inverter had none) feeding PV Output. Looked at Reposit Power and others after that, but Powerwall (and complete rewiring of fuse box) streamlines things. The battery challenge for those on two tier tariffs like us is using the cloud forecast to determine optimal ch
    1 point
  48. Marc, the Fronius stuff is much more usefull if you have a Fronius Smart Meter at your feed-in point. Additional usefulness is added by adding more FSM's to specific power circuits. There's also the Fronius Sensor Box, which adds even more data channels. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  49. I get what you mean. It's more like the short-lived A1GP formula. I've been shunning the F1 the last couple of decades because it was becoming more regulated, to the point where engineers' creativity has been strangled. They now only work in servitude to rules and regulations. In order for Formula E to succeed, they must allow engineers the freedom to make/take the technology to higher levels of efficiency.
    1 point
  50. Love to hear from anyone who has installed Siebel-Eltron (or other) Air Source heat pump for whole house hydronic and hot water. Vey keen to abandon gas.
    1 point


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