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  1. I thought I would share some experience on battery performance in what is probably a typical installation in suburban Melbourne. We have a 5.4kW PV system installed in 2012 with Tesla Powerwall (13.2kW storage) from 2018. My view is PV systems well and truly pay for themselves, but batteries not so - so maybe they have to go in the hobby or feel good camp. We are on a two tier tariff and our numbers show pretty consistent $150 a quarter saving across the year on top of the PV system - so roughly a 20 year payback ($600 a year on $12k for battery), which is likely well beyond the expected cycle life of the battery -- but who really knows. And to realise that level of saving we had to apply some smarts that don't appear very common amongst most of the battery installers we talked to. Fortunately the fact our house is on two phases confused many installers at the time and that led us to a couple of the smarter ones. But what interests me most now, and I wish I had known at the time, was the impact a battery has on our 'footprint' on the grid if managed well. Below are some pairs of graphs across the extremes of Melbourne. The first in each set is the basic solar generation versus house usage (instantaneous and cumulative) and the second is the battery view (so instantaneous Grid Use and Generation along with Battery Charge and flow). Let's start with a good summer day. On the first graph, strong solar generation between 8:00am and 6:00pm covering all the load (the heavy day loads are mainly swimming pool pumps) and a close to 15kW surplus of generation over need. On the second graph the battery started the day (midnight) around 60% charged (the red line. scale to the right), powered the house until 8:00am when the solar kicked in to carry house load and recharge the battery. Around 1pm the battery is full and excess is exported until 6pm when the battery takes over again and is back around 60% by midnight. So nothing drawn from grid, and export through the peak afternoon period when power is scarcer. The clear saving for us is not buying electricity at all, plus the feed in tariff. At the other end you have a bad winter day. From the standard graph our generation is well under house load for the day, even with pool pumps turned well down (and gas heating). The battery pattern here is quite different - it charges off-peak to 100% overnight, carries the morning load. marshals what solar it can during the middle of the day and powers the house through to off-peak time again when it starts charging for the next day. That is what locks in the winter gains. The smarts to do this should be included with all battery systems - it just requires a look at the predicted cloud cover or solar radiation for the next day to make a charging decision. There are some that do this, but in our experience beyond the skills of most we spoke to. And yes, some argue we are killing the battery with extra cycling - we will find out sometime. There are many variations between the two extremes that basically target a mix what morning charge should we target, and should swimming pool pumps run (along with judgement on washing machine, dishwasher etc.) Anyway, some food for thought. It fundamentally changes our footprint on the grid in a way that I sense is quite beneficial to an aging set of poles and wires - not driving large swings in export / import incessantly during the day as sun / clouds move in and out, using base load night time power, and not contributing to the peak in 'distributed generation' through the mornings in summer. Gibbo
    3 points
  2. Naturally when I was thinking about having a PV system installed at home I also thought “I should probably get a battery as well”. A couple of d friends have Tesla batteries and rave about them, so I was keen to convince myself that I needed one too. Now, I always spend heaps of time analysing my projects, thinking of the various ways it could be done, done better, done prettier, and occasionally in that process I reconsider whether it should actually be done at all. Price definitely comes in to play, but I don’t like to do things cheap, that’s usually just the long way to spending more. The whole purpose of adding a battery to a home power system is to save money by storing power from a cheaper source, and using it later when power is more expensive, so in that respect you have to know how much any bit of power you can use is going to cost. This is how I decided whether a battery was a worthwhile investment. Firstly I took my electricity rates. I have a time of use meter (TOU) as follows: 55c/kWh Peak 25c/kWh Shoulder 15c/kWh Off-peak And my contract with Origin here in NSW gives me a 21c/kWh feed-in tarrif, meaning every kWh I feed to the grid earns me 21c. So now I know that my cheapest power is 15c/kWh, which is during the Off-peak period from 10pm to 7am every day. OK, I can hear you screaming “but the power generated by your solar is the cheapest, it’s free!”. No it’s not, as I get paid 21c for every kWh I feed back to the grid, every one of those that I use myself instead of feeding back actually costs me 21c in lost payment. So how does this all relate to a battery? The electricity rate used to charge your battery, and the rate at the time you use your battery’s stored power both influence the actual cost of that power. Now to the battery itself. The purchase and install price of a Tesla Powerwall 2 battery as per my quotes was $14,000 and the battery is warranted for 37Mwh (37,000 kWh) of aggregate throughput. If we divide $14,000 by 37,000kWh we arrive at a purchase price of $0.378 per kWh. That means even if you charge your battery with free power, it still costs you 38c/kWh. Next you have to work out how much it costs to charge your battery. The Powerwall 2 has a round trip efficiency of 90%, so it takes 11% more kWh in than it gives back. Another way of putting this is that the power going in costs 11% more. So, now we can see that one kWh of power from the battery will cost us: 38c + 55c = 93c per kWh if charged using Peak power 38c + 25c = 63c per kWh if charged using Shoulder power 38c + 15c = 53c per kWh if charged using Off-peak power and finally, 38c + 21c = 59c per kWh if charged using our own ‘free’ power we’ve generated from our own solar PV system. As you can see, for me, power from a battery would be the most expensive power I could use, costing me more than my Peak rate. So what if your rates are different than mine? Say you’re on a fixed rate of 25c/kWh with a feed-in tarriff of 7c/kWh, then: 38c + 25c = 63c per kWh if charged from the grid 38c + 7c = 45c per kWh if charged from your solar PV Therefore a battery still isn’t economical as it costs 20c/kWh more than power from the grid. Using the method above, you should be able to work out the costs for your own situation. Cheers, Jason. Sorry about the font size and colour, I don’t seem to be able to fix it using this Marc, help!
    2 points
  3. Yeah... nah This reads like the usual crap the Smart Energy Council puts out. There's actually nothing unfair about it. When you consume energy you pay for retail margin + wholesale margin + transmission factor + market fees + environmental levy + distribution charges. That last bit is important - the money that goes into maintaining the poles and wires is paid when you use energy. When you export energy and a small (e.g. including residential) system you currently do not pay many money to maintain the poles and wires, and you get paid a fee which usually exceeds the wholesale market rate of energy at the time. These rules were drafted when solar was new and very expensive, not a common thing, and were encouraged to get people to buy solar at a time they'd rather not. This was a time of premium feed-in tariffs (66c/kWh) which had some enterprising and well-heeled types plonk 10kW on their home full knowing at some point they'd turn into mega revenue. We killed that tariff ultimately because it only made rich people richer, it'd didn't actually increase access. So it's fair to review other incentives. Nowadays solar PV is much more accessible. This incentive is in addition to the rebate you get for purchasing solar, which is paid out of general revenue (e.g. tax, which everyone pays). In short, if you can afford or can get solar, you currently get more than one free kick. If you cannot, you're still subsidising those who have solar, both at purchase and as they use it. On top of that small solar is an unregulated generator. If you owned a solar farm and the market rate for energy is below your price, or if there's a power quality problem on the grid that excess solar will make worse, you get turned off. That's normal. There's no such restrictions on residential PV. The best thing for residential PV is to self-consume it. Some proposals - to nix feed-in tariffs and put that money into subsidising self-consumption tech - comes from a genuinely good place. If you're going to export it to infrastructure you do not own (poles and wires), you should at least pay for their use - just like consumers do. There's nothing unfair about it, and for those without PV - a lot that's quite unfair about the current situation.
    2 points
  4. Our electricity bill for the 3rd quarter is in. Over winter, 28 May to 27th August, our breakdown was as follows. Solar Production was 2,725 kWh at an average of 29.6 kWh per day. Our usage of the solar production was 1,400 kWh, which is 51% own usage. Our usage from the grid was 2,216 kWh at a cost of $732.52, and we fed 1,325 kWh back to the grid (after own usage) for a return of $279.26. Our net bill was $453.26 Taking in to account our own usage, the total saving for the quarter due to the solar was $564.57 Effectively, our bill was reduced from $1,017.83 to $453.26 which is pretty good over a few pretty crappy months of weather. Our usage is quite high, averaging just over 39 kWh per day. The main culprits over winter being the resistive underfloor heating in two bathrooms using around 12 kWh per day, and an old fashioned oil heater in a part of the house where this is the only option for the moment using around 10 kWh per day. Since install last December, the system has produced 9.15 MWh of electricity, and has paid back 18.3% of it's installation cost. Cheers, Jason.
    2 points
  5. @Fred it really depends on needs and what you want to spend. You need to give yourself an uptime requirement, e.g. 'I want to meet my power requirements xx % of the time'. For what it's worth a 99% system means that nearly 4 days are offline. If you were doing it properly IMHO you'd have: Solar PV to whatever your demand is Good thermal storage because its cheaper Battery to suit (Optionally) smart UPS for critical loads (internet, security, etc - enough for the house to tell itself what's happening under all conditions) Diesel SGP for backup Optional automatic or manual changeover switching You would also need switchboard that still meets AS3000 and is compliant with requirements for multiple supply sources. That it is offgrid does not exempt a home from regulatory compliance. Done cheaply for a 5kW solar system, marginal batteries and inverter, limited thermal storage and an entry-level SGP this is a $20k job. I have a customer with a (well) over $100k install across ~15kW of LG panels, four LG Chem batteries, two SolarEdge inverters, a 12kVA Cummins/Stamford genset, multiple thermal storage, critical loads independently backed up, an industrial-grade switchboard hookup, good DR on his HVAC and semiautomatic changeover switching. It wasn't cheap. It's rock solid. You will not get out of a capable installation done right for under $35k without gas; you might be able to get something decent down to $25k with gas. You can go less, I wouldn't.
    2 points
  6. I've just joined, having seen Marc's link from Stereo Net Australia. We've got a domestic system, with battery, running LG panels (about 7.8kW ) from memory. It's been the best thing we've done. In terms of other renewable or free energy activity, we run a couple of worm-farms using domestic food scraps. I've also been a glider pilot since the age of 17, using natural atmospheric sources of lift to fly and travel cross-country, sometimes for hours and hundreds of kilometres.
    2 points
  7. Hi Full Range, You will be wanting a PHEV (Plug in hybrid electric vehicle) if you want a hybrid that, as the name suggests, plugs in. There aren't a whole lot to choose from at the moment, but more are on the way. This gives you a much cheaper buy in point at this time to get a taste of electric mobility. Off the top of my head, Mitsubishi, Volvo and Hyundai all have PHEV offerings. Think there are some older BMW's, Mercs and Audis that offer the tech too. You will save a heap over an all battery EV, but that will come at the cost of all electric range.
    2 points
  8. I installed an Enphase/Jinko system in late 2018. I have been very happy with it ever since. I wanted to future proof it as much as possible and be ready for 2 x electric cars so I went the biggest I could fit on the roof - 35.65kW of panels and 30kW of inverters. Actually had to extend the car garage to fit all 115 panels on! Anyway, it was a fun project and is on track to pay for itself in the next couple of years (assuming FiT does not crash horribly). In summer it prints me quite large monthly cheques, and in winter it mints smaller cheques but still ensures zero bills. Best day to date was a hair under 250kWh, worst day on record a poultry 6kWh (an exceptionally stormy and crappy day). Typically in the middle of winter it is unlikely to drop below 80kWh a day. I went Micro's as I have a myriad of roof faces at a variety of orientations. It was a tricky install, but came up well. I'm watching battery tech closely, but it still has a long way to go before its cost competitive. I'm hopeful that V2X will be viable soon as then the cost of the battery is amortised between vehicle and storage. Watch this space.
    2 points
  9. As far as I am aware the only state that has a home battery power storage subsidy scheme Is South Australia Is it time for the commonwealth and other states to generate some interest in home battery storage subsidies I feel that by doing this, it will by sheer numbers reduce initial cost over time If that is coupled with an innovation grant scheme for research of future battery storage technology to help in reducing our greenhouse footprint from manufacture to end user My preferred battery system will have these core features 1) High capacity 2) Long Life with as little loss in efficiency over time 3) Recyclable so the old system can be traded in for new at a lower cost 4) Cause no harm I’m sure you will have more to add The first point of action to voice your opinion is to contact your local members of all 3 tiers of government Local / State / Federal Then find a suitable lobby group and voice your opinion
    2 points
  10. Anecdotally around $17k installed with inverter etc. Will be interested to hear actual price if someone has one at their place. Issues are poor round trip efficiency, need an additional inverter in conjunction with the battery, they need down time to do some sort of maintenance cycle (not a problem if you have two connected as they self manage so both aren't off line). On the plus side, they should last twice as long as a lithium battery, can withstand hot environments (i.e. Australia), they don't use rare earth metals and can do 100% DoD without damage. If I could afford one and had a 20 year time horizon, that's what I would buy. In reality though, I think it will be V2X for me as soon as its available.
    2 points
  11. 22 Panels totaling 5.4kW and Delta Solivia inverter dating back to 2012 and still going strong. Added Powerwall 2 in 2018 along with upgrading breakers on PV set up, and rewiring and separating internal switchboard into a main and sub board to separate out the essential circuits (backed up by Powerwall) from the rest. Best advice the sparky's ever gave us was to install an MDF panel on some 2 x 4 timber behind the Powerwall / Inverter etc. to hide all the wiring. The Powerall is an AC connected system that sits on the house side of the Solar PV inverter, and comprises the battery and its own 5kW inverter (the grey box upper left on install). This allows it to back up the essential circuits in the house when the mains fails. Powerwall also has its own monitors etc. that sit in the switchboard and support comprehensive monitoring.
    2 points
  12. This news just in PPK Group has announced that they have unlocked the code for creating Lithium Sulphur batteries at a cost affective price News release on this link https://www.ppkgroup.com.au/site/news-media/ppk-group-in-box-seat-with-aussie-breakthrough-that-could-power-the-world
    1 point
  13. I did read in the forums that the Huawei monitoring was delaying everything by 2 hours there for a bit. The fix was be patient and wait as the servers get overwhelmed with loads of traffic at times. Which made me think, once you buy the Inverter, the companies don't really need to worry as much looking after their servers as say a company like Solar Analytics does as that is the only thing they are doing and would lose customers, so its in their best interest to keep it running really well. More likely to have more updates/improvements to their software too over time.
    1 point
  14. With a name like Full Range, I expect nothing less! 🙂 Thanks again for the reply. No Gas here and electric HWS. Average 22 kW per day. I have so many aspects to my Stereo and would love to know what it all uses. Lots on small power supplies running different items. I could try and put it all on one plug and use one of those little meters. In the past year have replaced a few things. Got a new fridge 520L kitchen, New F&P Front loader washing machine, New 65" TV's and threw out my 2nd 20yr old fridge I had in back garage all in the hope of lowering my Energy bills. Replaced all lights with LED's. Still after all this my bills are high for me at the average 22kW/day. Looking forward to Solar ASAP. 🙂
    1 point
  15. Since getting better analytics and monitoring the myenergi app (most waking hours), I find myself starting to obsess now over real-time consumption. Soon I reckon I might be able to see and hear power flowing through the walls. Anyone else, or is this just me??? 🙂
    1 point
  16. These are the 330W panels that were recommended for me so you can compare the specs https://www.trunsunsolar.com/wp-content/uploads/download/au/EN-DUDRIVE-TSHM-120L-AU.pdf And this is the inverter Sungrow is the worlds number one inverter manufacturer https://service.sungrowpower.com.au/files/Web_Files/FAQ/Crystal/Troubleshooting/UM_201803_Crystal G2_SG3K_5K-D Datasheet_V1.0.pdf
    1 point
  17. I have the 5kw Sungrow inverter and have no problems at all so far I have also learned recently that if you add a seperate ( I think it’s called ) a Sungrow S100 Energy meter. With this extra meter you can also see via the app the export to the grid amount and many other features over the standard dongle Without the meter you only see your input from the panels to the inverter
    1 point
  18. A couple of news stories that indicate that solid state batteries are close to being a reality in EVs The expectations are shorter recharge times and longer distance travel time Samsung https://www.whichcar.com.au/car-news/samsung-solid-state-battery-breakthrough Toyota https://thedriven.io/2020/12/14/toyota-plans-revolutionary-solid-state-battery-for-2021/ Other news https://www.wired.co.uk/article/what-is-solid-state-battery-toyota-dyson https://insideevs.com/news/465188/nio-150-kwh-solid-state-batteries-2022/
    1 point
  19. It would be a newer, more modern meter that would be installed. When I had our system installed, before it was allowed to be turned on I had to have a new meter put in. The old one was a digital Time-of-use one. Origin put the new one in, at a cost of $45. The new one is read remotely online, no need for a meter reader to come around. On the Origin website, with the new smart meters you can see your daily usage, and your daily feed-in. They’re well worth having, especially at the very low cost that Origin charges for the installation. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  20. Well the first 3 months went quick Regular monitoring gave me a good indication of how much power I’m generating Just a refresh I have a 6.6 kWh system x 5 Kw inverter x 20 Panels Highest daily generation was 39.8 kWh ( and it’s not summer yet ) with an average of approx 28 kWh I just received my first bill and I’m happy to report that it’s in credit Drum roll Credit $424.39 At this rate I will pay off the system in no time System cost was $3500
    1 point
  21. I'm still waiting for the end of my first billing period, but it's looking pretty good going by the Fronius data. 8.2kW inv, (limited to 5kW export). Since 18/11: PV production = 2,440 kWh (~39 kWh/d average , ~65 kWh/d peak) Self consumption = 526 kWh Total consumption = 981 kWh.
    1 point
  22. Analysis for the full year of 2020 Total Production: 12.882 MWh Total Consumption: 12.931 MWh Highest Production Day: 59.3 kWh on 11th November Lowest Production Day: 1.9 kWh on 26th July Daily Averages - Production: 35.2 kWh Consumption: 35.3 kWh Own Consumption: 16.6 kWh Export: 18.6 kWh Import: 18.7 kWh Cost: $1.88 Yield: 4.1 kWh/kW We had 195 'Green Days' where we exported more than we imported, but as you can see above, we just dipped out on having a 'Green Year' by a tiny amount, we basically broke even energy-wise. Over 2020 the system paid back 26.6% of it's installation cost. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  23. Like a lot of people, I've looked at getting solar installed a few times over the past fifteen years. Up until recently, the payback wasn't there in a timeframe I was happy with. Last November, I thought it was about time to get it done, before the providers started refusing installs as they are in some areas. I looked at both string and micro-inverter systems, and as my roof is north facing (points 9 degrees east of north, inclined at 23 degrees), and totally unshaded, a string system was a good option. In late November 2019 I had a 8.58kW system installed using: 26x QCells Q.PEAK DUO-G5+ 330 Watt Fronius Primo 8.2 inverter Fronius Smart Meter The 26 panels are in two strings of 13 panels each. The Fronius Smart Meter is installed at the feed-in point, which gives some very useful data in relation to consumption, feed-in to the grid, usage from the grid, self consumption from the solar, as well as other data. This is all logged in five minute intervals on SolarWeb (the Fronius cloud), and I also have custom reports set up to give me all the data I need for my rather comprehensive spreadsheet. As of today, in the seven months since it was connected, it has produced an average of 33.6 kWh/day, and paid back 14.7% of the total installed price. 100% payback should be less than four years. I've also bought another three Fronius Smart Meters, which will be installed on several power circuits so I can do further analysis. These were bought unused on an auction site for about $150 each, instead of the $700 the cost through an electrician, or $300 from a supplier. 1. Climate - Daikin 16kW Inverter aircon, plus underfloor heating in two bathrooms. 2. Flat - The basemant flat that has a separate circuit 3. I have this wired on 3-pin leads so I can monitor any plug-in device I like. Currently it's on my rack. Another device bought through the auction site was a Fronius Sensor Box. This box interfaces directly with the inverter and to SolarWeb, and gives more channels of data like temperature, wind speed, and more. I'm going to use one channel to count pulses from my gas meter, so I can analyse my total energy usage. Here's a shot of the array on the roof, taken using a GoPro on a long stick. The array is about 11 metres above ground level. Thanks for looking. Jason.
    1 point
  24. By the way pricing as supplied to me was: 5.0kWh 48V WITH 5kw Sungrow Hybrid Inverter (single phase) for $6500 8.5kWh 48V with 5kW Sungrow Hybrid inverter (Single phase) for $10500 15kWh 384V with 10kW Solax Hybrid inverter (3 phase) for $18500 Price for 15kWh without inverter was approx $14500 All claim 50,000 cycles with 25 year warranty and 99% depth discharge and operating temperature range of -20 to +80c 5kWh weighs 65kg, 8.5kWh is 97kg and 15kWh is 120kg
    1 point
  25. I stumbled across them as well and have been trying to get more information out of the company. They are claiming that the "battery" is currently undergoing the approval process and they expect it to be available for purchase around March next year. I am actually in the market for a home battery and the specs and price on these are very attractive but I am somewhat doubtful as I can't find any evidence that anyone else it the world is doing this and the specs don't seem to add up with what I understand of Graphene supercapacitors. In particular the weight of the product is similar to weight for same capacity LiIon battery but according to what I have read it should be many times heavier. The 25 year warranty is appealing but of course totally useless if the company doesn't stick around to honour it. The company did respond to my initial email and sent through a Spec sheet and some basic information but they haven't responded to my follow-up questions yet.
    1 point
  26. A fairly simple way of gauging relative performance, day to day, or site to site etc, is kWh/kW. Simply divide the kWh produced by the kW of panels installed. So in your case of your average production, 28 / 6.6 = 4.24 kWh/kW over the period. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  27. An excellent result. Not sure about Brissy, but August and September were very good months for solar in Sydney. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  28. Let me know how you go. I deal with the CEO and main advisor though I've been involved with them for ~5 years now (since it was in development). If you don't get answers you like, drop me a line and I'll find you someone senior to talk to. I like both Reposit and CET. Reposit is further ahead in making money out of your battery - they are super represented in all government forums on VPP whether technical or regulatory. But if you have multiple devices you want to control intelligently against each other for best use of your tariff, CET is supreme. And the hot water system is effing awesome. I've trialled a few - from the locals to SolarEdge, Fronius and Dimplex (the latter being arguably the best of the retrofits IMHO) - from an all-around perspective I got the Solahart system the CET is intended for. It's just brilliant. Yes a heat pump is more efficient though unless doing it super properly (new builds apply) with an awesome heatpump, not a cheap Chromagen, I'd not touch it - just put the money in more PV.
    1 point
  29. No supply fee, though a dude came around and locked the meter out. I guess it's not bad; leaves the option in future.
    1 point
  30. If you want to have a chat with the lead devs let me know, can arrange.
    1 point
  31. Hello everyone, thought I would pop over from Stereonet and support this site. looking forward to learning more about renewables as I’m thinking about solar panel’s soon cheers
    1 point
  32. I wouldn't be touching Mitsubishi with a barge pole at the moment, it's possible they will drop out of Australia totally. IMO hybrids were a necessary step, but totally useless now. Go fully electric if you can find one you like with the range you need, or just get a turbo diesel if you are travelling very long distances. With a hybrid, you are lugging around a whole lot of extra weight and complexity that you're not using. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  33. I've had a long-term interest in sustainable living and renewable energy. My wife and I moved here from Melbourne around 4 years ago, having dismantled and recycled the original home on the site and replaced it with a prefab home. It's not quite as energy efficient as we'd like (ie, it isn't a passive house), but hopefully we can add some thermally broken triple glazed windows in a few years. We have a grid connected hybrid PV system and battery, we hope to upgrade our panels from 4.5kW to 10kW by the end of the year. We have a 17kW lead-acid gel battery, but only 4kW is routinely useable unless we lose the grid connection, this is the big problem with lead-acid batteries. Hopefully more panels will reduce the load on the battery. We've tried to minimise power use in the house: it's all electric, 2x Daikin US7 for HVAC, a Sanden Heat Pump, all LED lighting, and a reasonably well sealed house, with R6 insulation floor and ceiling, R2.5 in the walls, along with good passive orientation and siting the house for cross flow cooling. Despite that, we are regularly using 20kWh a day (up to 30kWh when we charge the car). We have a reed bed sewerage system that treats grey and black water on-site, a 40,000L tank water supply, mainly for fire suppression to our rooftop sprinklers, automated to activate at 50 degrees, and we have a permanent spring for fresh water. One of our main energy uses is a Tesla Model S. Our grid connection makes it difficult to charge directly from rooftop PV, AusNet, the world's worst power company to deal with, has made us connect the house to one circuit of 40A x2 two phase, and the charger on the other phase, so the charger doesn't see the renewable power. Future projects: sustainable garden, based on the reed bed wicking trenches. extra PV capacity triple glazed thermally broken windows Cybertruck, if I can manage it without a divorce😀
    1 point
  34. It’s a thing. I know, I’ve got it. I check our power consumption between two and ten or so times a day. Last Friday I had a Fronius Smart Meter installed to monitor consumption on my circuits that I call ‘Climate’, which is air conditioning and underfloor heating. I now know how much power the underfloor heating in the bathrooms really uses. 15kWh per day on weekends, and 10kWh per day during the week. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  35. I haven't looked at Reposit lately but looked interesting a couple of years back, but they were a bit 'young' as a company and it was hard to get clear information on its capabilities. Hopefully that has improved. What I would look for in any truly 'smart' controller is something that looks at the local radiation forecast for the next day and and makes optimisation decisions based on that, particularly in a 2 tier tariff situations. Only that way can they effectively manage overnight charge levels depending on expected solar generation the next day. Some do that on a ' what we expect this time of the year' basis but that is not as efficient as actually reading something the solcast.com.au forecast. Gibbo
    1 point
  36. WOW - That is impressive 😱 Im going to give you a “Respect “ for that system
    1 point
  37. Hi Marc, Being a micro inverter system, I need one inverter per panel, so I have 115 inverters in total. Every inverter is rated at 260 Watts continuous, so 115 x 260 = 29,900 W of inverters. In reality the inverters can spike to 270 Watts for a combined temporary output of 31,050 W. There is a pretty specific set of conditions required to exceed 30kw however and I have only ever seen it a couple of times for brief periods. Output of the system to grid is limited to 30kW, so thats the max that will ever pump back to the grid, but I can exceed that briefly if consuming the delta in the house. Analytics - Enphase is probably one of the best. As you have an inverter per panel, you have per panel data. I have the optional consumption CT's installed so it gives me a pretty good idea of what is going on. Panel outputs can be viewed as a map overlay so you can identify dirty/faulty panels and inverters and know exactly which one it is. You can also view lifetime data which is very interesting to see the impact of shading and panel orientation. You hear people always rattling on about panel orientation, but in my system, with a 18 months of data the difference is not substantial. Yes north facing is the best,but not by a margin that would keep me up at night. East and west seem to pump out roughly 90% of what my north facers do. Additionally, I have the installer toolkit which lets me see real time production and consumption data. That's great for determining specific loads, i.e. turn on the Anthem P5, crank it up and watch the power consumption on the house increase a fair bit, lol (SNA'ers may know what I'm on about here). Specific diversion is not really needed on my system. We just have the hot water on a timer to come on during the day and run the appliances we can during the day also. There is always plently of power there to cover what is going on. Smart controls become somewhat redundant. Even the Zappi rarely has to throttle, it only throttles as the sun goes down, then turns on again once off peak kicks in (if needed). I have been following solar for a few years waiting for just the right time to get in, the perfect storm of system size, solar subsidy (many people don't know that the STC subsidy reduces annually) and equipment cost. In SA i believe this occured mid to late 2018 when I installed. SAPN reduced the maximum residential system size for single phase from 10kW to 5kW but retained the 30kW limit for three phase systems. I felt that wouldn't last long so pulled the trigger on the biggest system I physically could as I was certain they would restrict 3 phase systems soon. Turns out I was right, and I slipped in just before the rules were changed to 15kW max on 3 phase. Just need to hope now that they do not introduce retrospective limits.... Not sure that they really could though. I've included a few happy snaps below, best production day, biggest consumption day, total production and a view showing per panel lifetime production on various orientations (you can see impact of shading on a couple of the panels in that one too).
    1 point
  38. I'm a Redflow shareholder, and it was too expensive for me, even with a (small) shareholder's discount. They are about to introduce their generation 2 batteries, if this flows though to the Z Cell, it may be cheaper
    1 point
  39. Our journey into solar started a few years ago. It's good to be here. I'll post more about the system soon. Cheers.
    1 point
  40. Maintaining stability in the grid should be looked at as a free pass for the power generators With the right smart inverter connected to a solar / storage battery system this is achievable when critical mass is reached
    1 point
  41. Totally agree. I would go further and suggest the subsidy could be moved from panels / inverters towards batteries, and the power distribution companies should chip in as well. Whilst panel / inverter subsidies have been great, we are at the point where underlying costs make them a sensible investment decision without subsidies. And if the distribution companies continue to struggle (and not invest) in a network that that will embrace distributed generation, subsidise batteries to help maintain balance onthe use of the grid.
    1 point
  42. I've heard that we should be seeing a "new generation" of batteries arriving on the market for what would have been the end of this year, but at a guess that might be delayed because of COVID? I was also told that arrival would bring prices down and the possibility of more government grants/schemes. All rumours though. 🙂
    1 point
  43. Welcome @Full Range and glad you could join us (at another little corner of the web). One of the conveniences of working nights when it comes to power consumption. Without batteries, it will be interesting come Summer if you will truly get a zero bill? I've done my best to get our overnight power usage down but with servers and so many "standby" products, it seems an impossible reality unfortunately.
    1 point
  44. With FIT dropping all the time, and with a 10kW+ solar PV I find myself with surplus power each day for a grand return of less than $2 a day credit. It's hardly worth it when I have an EV sitting there that could make more economical use of that surplus power. I wanted a set and forget way of charging the EV rather than monitoring the export manually and plugging in when required. Elon says, a happy Tesla is a plugged in Tesla (to max 80% for best battery life apparently). So my hunt for a solution led me to Myenergi (UK) and its Zappi charger. It's been installed today and was a direct and easy replacement for the Tesla wall charger, other than running the clamp sensor back to the board. It does everything it says it will do, and I've set it into ECO+ mode, which will only charge the EV at an appropriate rate based on surplus solar generation. So as we speak I'm charging at 1kW/6A (capable of up to 32A just like the Tesla wall charger), and that charge rate will vary throughout the day. For someone that does little kms (especially now Melbourne is in lockdown), it's essentially trickle charging and that's perfect for our needs. Overall, a great, smart and intuitive product that works exactly how it says it does. Myenergi make some clever products and I'll be looking further into this brand and its range. In Australia, EVolution is bringing them in and at the time of writing, the single phase unit is $1,395: https://www.evolutionaustralia.com.au/product-page/myenergi-zappi-7kw-electric-car-charger-for-home Very happy with the end result, other than ordering the white version, and being supplied with a hybrid white/black due to a factory packing mistake. They wanted me to return the trim cover at my own expense before even shipping out the right part back to me which I just don't agree with (not my mistake), so I'll just put up with it.
    1 point
  45. Cool, so you can get total combined data in your energy balance. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  46. Welcome @Jone5y and thanks for joining us. Look forward to sharing your solar and EV journey with you. Before installing solar 6 months ago, and then EV ownership last month I knew nothing at all (not that I know much now!) and it would have been great to have a resource like this one. Hopefully you'll get the advice and guidance you need to make informed decisions.
    1 point
  47. I don't know for sure but I think this might be practically impossible. The industry has become so regulated now, and even though some of the installers out there might be better suited to washing windows, I think the red tape and inspections process would see no solar company allowing you to supply or install any part of the system that ultimately they get signed off to their name. The inspections process (in VIC) has apparently caused many installers to leave the industry. Whether it was because their work was not up to standard in the first place, or whether the inspectors are being over the top, depends on who you speak to. Either way, there's nothing wrong with being too thorough when it comes to PV and safety I think. My inspector seemed to know his stuff and seemed a reasonable bloke.
    1 point
  48. There are a few gems out there, but unfortunately not the mainstream guys. Hopefully this forum will surface some of our joint experiences and help mobilise what I am sure is a wealth of personal knowledge on more linformed ideas and solutions. I went through many iterations of clamps and monitoring with solar alone (as Solivia Inverter had none) feeding PV Output. Looked at Reposit Power and others after that, but Powerwall (and complete rewiring of fuse box) streamlines things. The battery challenge for those on two tier tariffs like us is using the cloud forecast to determine optimal charge overnight. More on that in other discussions.
    1 point
  49. Marc, the Fronius stuff is much more usefull if you have a Fronius Smart Meter at your feed-in point. Additional usefulness is added by adding more FSM's to specific power circuits. There's also the Fronius Sensor Box, which adds even more data channels. Cheers, Jason.
    1 point
  50. I get what you mean. It's more like the short-lived A1GP formula. I've been shunning the F1 the last couple of decades because it was becoming more regulated, to the point where engineers' creativity has been strangled. They now only work in servitude to rules and regulations. In order for Formula E to succeed, they must allow engineers the freedom to make/take the technology to higher levels of efficiency.
    1 point


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